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Milan Fashion Week: Days 1 & 2

Sorry for the break I took yesterday but you know, when you look at 30 runway shows a day at least - even if it’s just from the Internet - sometimes you need to rest. But welcome to Milan!
I’m extremely excited because Milan Fashion Week is always my favourite part of the fashion month, with the most exciting fashion shows. Let’s go straight to the first two days of shows.

On the first day, Angelos Bratis was the chosen one for this season to show at the Armani Theatre a collection in which - I was probably influenced by knowing that the designer is Greek - there was a new take on Greek tradition, which has become cliché: draping. But draping this time was subtle and easy, and all the outfits had a relaxed, chilling vibe.

Stella Jean (photo 1) is definitely one of the designers whose collection I expect more during fashion week. This time she did one of her usual fantasy trips, deciding to go back to her roots to Haiti, the place which inspired her for her prints for this season. Now, though, she added a touch of sporty to her looks, which really freshens up her chic flamboyant style. I have to admit many of the things she presented for spring 2015 are something which I’ve already seen in her work: balloon skirts, elegant coats and some prints, exactly like others she’s already used. I still like it, but I hope she changes some little things in the future, because the risk is becoming redundant and boring.

Gucci (photo 2) was just one of the dozens brands choosing to translate 70s into a modern atmosphere this season. Frida Giannini chose warm earth tones, boots, denim and an overall rock vibe - Rolling Stones, I would say - always keeping the elegant style of the brand. 

Antonio Marras for his line I’m Isola Marras was one of those designers seduced by sport this year and conceived a collection for a young girl wearing oversize outfits in comfortable shapes and who loves colour blocking. Fay (photo 3) went sporty as well, mixing it with glamorous sequins proving again to be one of the most playful brands.

Alberta Ferretti (photo 4) set a challenge for herself this season: how to keep the usual romanticism of the brand inserting a sexy, slightly rock and roll 70s style. So, she experimented, delivering very 70s shapes in delicate fabrics and mixing the ethereal sheer chiffon with denim. Awesome.

Fausto Puglisi chose optical effects for his prints, while Francesco Scognamiglio (photo 5) went very vintage drawing inspiration by 30s. His collection was definitely dated, but not old-fashioned. It looked completely authentic and sexiness was not missing.

Brunello Cucinelli applied menswear tailoring to womenswear this time, feminizing the collection a little bit with ostrich feathers. The dresses in lighter tones had easier silhouettes and softer fabrics. I was then stunned by La Petite Robe by Chiara Boni, which more art than simply fashion. She was inspired by the Italian artist Lucio Fontana, using solid colours and putting up a real exhibit with only four dresses halfway between ready to wear and avant-garde. 

Day 2 started out in a great way with Max Mara, again taking 70s as starting point for the collection, with tight waists, long shapes and beautiful very long coats which reached the models’ ankles. Prints were the element which lightened up the looks.

I was skeptical about Emporio Armani (photo 6) collection, because usually it’s very toned-down and subtle - read ‘bordeline boring’. And the starting looks had a kind of understated beauty which I usually associate with Armani. But then it came: blue. Definitely Armani’s favourite colour, this time was declined in every possible shade, and with the blue also came some little elements which made the clothes less ‘normcore’ without giving up on simplicity: some ruffles there, some feathers here, beautiful effortless knots adorning basic little dresses.

Fendi (photo 7) was all about movement: sporty styles, dangling strips of leather, mixing prints, everything helped giving a dynamic impression. DSquared2 (photo 8), then, chose essential lines but flamboyant prints resulting in totally modern outfits. I loved how the ruffles on skirts, dresses and tops made the fabric look like carnations.

Prada joined the ‘normcore’ movement for this season, without obviously deleting its own signature. The white lines following the panels of the outfits were something which I’d already seen in Prada’s collections, but it was a slight reference to vintage, like the brocade, the collage of different fabrics and raw hems, which really made the collection stand out. Daniela Gregis won me over with a collection full of linens, wrinkly fabrics and a feeling which made me think of a Greek island in summer with its effortless beauty.

To finish with an explosion, Moschino (photo 9) is the right choice. Jeremy Scott continues his pop art-like mission of analysing every aspect of the modern economy, and after fast food last season, he decided to turn to another phenomenon of the XX century: Barbie! Instead of dressing the famous doll, something which many designers have been doing lately, he decided to dress his models like her. And so, here you go with shocking pink separates, Moschino logos using Barbie font, cliché attires - what about the pink mirror iPhone case? - as well as with new and exciting ideas, like the huge belt used as a top. Barbie reloaded.

xxx

TOP 5 London Fashion Week

Another fashion week is other, another one starting off. But first, let me tell you about my TOP 5 collections from London.

1. Erdem: It really looked like it was telling a story. Victorian botanical gardens: that’s just so romantic and exciting at the same time

2. Faustine Steinmetz: the most innovative designer among all. And the fact she’s just starting out in fashion tells a lot about how far this girl is going to get.

3. Preen by Thornton Bregazzi: sporty exotic, two of fashion’s favourite inspirations at the moment. It could just be a success.

4. J. W. Anderson: it takes a lot of effort to rethink pieces of clothing in an unusual way, and this was definitely what made this collection special.

5. Emilia Wickstead: sometimes traditional femininity is just the way to be successful and this was the apotheosis of simple chic.

I guess my review for the first day of Milan Fashion Week (yesterday) is coming tomorrow along with the second day, so expect a huge post :D

xxx

London Fashion Week - Day 5

We’re halfway through the fashion month after London Fashion Week closed yesterday giving space to Milan for the week starting today - and I’m so excited that I’m going to Milan on Sunday :D

Simone Rocha (photo 1) had a cerebral collection, which was very dark and dramatic - I love the hairstyle, I thought it was really poetic in some way. There was a kind of cockiness to it, visible in the sexy fur hems of the first dresses, and a lot of femininity through the use of ethereal sheer fabrics and brocade-like flowery textiles. It was a romantic but not predictable collection.

Marques’Almeida delivered one of the worst shows of this season, with raw, torn fabrics, which could even be interesting, but really looked cheap. Sometimes fashion can be POSITIVELY ugly, when there’s a reason for that ugliness and a concept behind it. This was just ugly ugly.

Ryan Lo (photo 2) had irony on his side, choosing to put on a parody of resortwear/holidaywear where you could find every possible cliché about travelling and trips: exotic setting with palms, bright colours, ruffles, sea-inspired prints.

During the last day in London it was also time for Fashion East, an event taking place every season with emerging designers chosen by an important panel of judges. This time the three designers showing were Ed Marler, Helen Lawrence and Louise Alsop but none of them delivered anything I found extremely interesting. It was very disappointing.

Tata Naka (photo 3), the duo from Georgia, decided to play with curves for ss15, and even if some of the dresses were too simple and traditional, the overall impression was good. Meadham Kirchhoff (photo 4) went crazy and really brought something new to the table, with their concept against all rules. It was difficult to appreciate the clothes though, as they were really all over the place. Still, I think this was their goal. Reject everything.

H by Hakaan Yildirim (photo 5) had me really caught up, as at the beginning I thought there was a sort of space and universe futuristic inspiration - I mean, what are those circles around the models’ heads if not Saturn rings? - also given by the square-cut shapes of the garments. I couldn’t understand what was the relationship with bees though. And then I realised: those hexagonal shapes, looking like mechanical parts linked together by tiny rings, were cubby holes in reality. Now everything has sense. And it’s much more fun. And it still looks futuristic. Very good job.

Don’t forget to stay tuned to know about my TOP 5 for London Fashion Week and, from tomorrow, follow Milan Fashion Week with my reviews.

xxx

London Fashion Week: Day 4

As we’ve come today to the last day of fashion week in London, yesterday there were a few runway shows catching my attention - and some of them not in a positive way.

I think Antonio Berardi's collection (photo 1) was one of the best I've seen so far. He started out for his concept taking inspiration from a film from 2011, 'The Flowers of War', where Christian Bale plays the role of a false priest who helps women and children getting safe during the rape of Nanking in 1937. And the atmosphere of the church, with its stained glasses and its shaded light struck the designer, who decided to reproduce this effect of fractured light with glitters and sequins, resulting in glamorous but not obvious embellishments. Many of the textiles looked like someone painted brushes of colours over them, like on a canvas and the silhouettes chosen were chaste but Berardi added transparencies to sex them up a little bit. The overall conclusion worked really well.

Roksanda (photo 2; I didn’t know Roksanda Ilincic decided to call her brand only Roksanda, or is it another line?) took inspiration from an artist working with PVC, Julia Dault. Her clothes for this season went for a very strong and static colour blocking but also prints which gave frenetic movement to the dresses. The colour palette was bright but not varied, pale pink, electric blue, light blue, neon orange were the main tones, and it all helped giving an organic and cohesive atmosphere to the collection.

Erdem's designer (photo 3) was inspired by another woman, this time a Victorian biologist, an inspiration which excused the botanical vibe of the whole collection. But as if flowers and plants were too much of an obvious reference for spring, Erdem had the brilliant idea to use the image of the greenhouse, with its shapes and lines which gave the chance to play with the structure of lace. Golden embroideries over black sheer fabric, for example on a V-neck adorned by a long row of tiny golden buttons, represented the Victorian opulence instead.

I was not sure about what Michael Van der Ham wanted to convey with his collection because all I could see was an interesting, but chaotic, collage of very different things, shapes, fabrics, textures, and even, maybe, an exotic taste to his looks. I was puzzled as well when looking at Christopher Bailey’s collection for Burberry Prorsum. Where was this collection coming from? Research on light and shadow, I would say looking at the different layers of dégradé chiffon featured in basically every look. But I’m not sure. I need an explanation.

Issa mixed horses - ??? - with curves, stating an immediate connection with movement, which was obviously at the core of its inspiration. Christopher Kane delivered an emotional collection where the rope was the main symbol, seen as representative of connections between people, and especially through the use of knots linking different ‘lives’ together. Pity for the colour palette, which I found very dull and depressed. Huishan Zhang went much more cheerful instead, playing with different textures over bon ton style silhouettes.

Peter Pilotto (photo 4) basically brought a hot mess to the runway: 70s, sometimes 60s geometrical patterns, stripes, flowers, geometrical stained glass-like textiles, mosaic. But it worked over the simple A-line dresses, presenting itself as an ode to fantasy and free thinking.

Giles did a very interesting thing. He took wild beasts - the one usually going under the term ‘animalier’ in fashion - and literally LAUGHED at them: a leopard paw became pink and harmless over a t-shirt; a snake became a cute ornament for the model’s neckline; another leopard was basically dismembered and recomposed over a dress. Animalier is such a predictable move for designers, but he changed things up in a very creative way.

I want to finish with Tom Ford, who put on such a boring show I would have never be able to imagine he could do. It just looked like a vulgar and old-fashioned Hedi Slimane. Such a disappointment.

xxx

Project Runway Season 13 - Episode 8: The Rainway

How exciting was it? For the avant-garde challenge of the season the producers of the show went avant-garde with the runway as well and it became…a RAINWAY!!! If you didn’t see the show and don’t have any clue what I’m talking about, just look at the photos, and you’ll immediately understand. And Tim was right when he said, at the end of the episode, that that was the best runway show in the history of Project Runway - even though he says that at least once every season. What’s more, designers this time really did a fantastic job, at least most of them, to deliver a great great show.

Sean, oh Sean. Where were you in the first episodes? If I think about what this designer did in the first, let’s say, four episodes? I can’t remember anything. And then, he literally blossomed, creating stunning pieces one after another. But until now I was still waiting for him to make another big mistake, and no, he didn’t. He won me over instead. When creativity meets a smart mind, this is what happens. His avant-garde look was perfect from every point of view. Yes, the dress in itself was nothing, maybe even a little bit Dorothy-from-the-Wizard-of-Oz-like. But then it transformed. I hate reading comments about the dress was not ok because not avant-garde. But avant-garde is not only about being over-the-top, it’s about literally ‘looking forward’, and he did something that no one ever did before. Then his choice of having a simple look was perfect because it balanced the complexity of the concept; not to talk about the fact that he really thought about what the runway was going to be, and incorporated into his work. Do I then have to mention that he made the crinoline out of waterproof material? This is a GENIUS. And it was not even too literal, like Kini for example, who thought well about the maybe too straightforward relationship rain/umbrella - and his look was my second favourite. I’m stunned by Sean’s piece, it was perfect.

Korina instead is one of those designers who goes high once and very low the next time. I wish she didn’t have the immunity this time, because she really deserved to go home, not Fäde for sure. So, what happened? She basically had an initial concept which was going to end up being a bad fancy dress, and she realised on the second day of the challenge. So, first of all, how can you even consider yourself a designer if you don’t immediately see that what you’re doing is BAD? And this is the second time it happens with her - remember the first time she was safe by the skin of her teeth. It’s not like Amanda, who does bad things and cannot even SEE that what she’s doing is terrible - another unforgivable behaviour. Korina does crap and then realises what she’s doing at the last moment. What was this? Just a boring little dress with a silver structure wrapper around the arms. It’s basically nothing.

Fäde was eliminated, and for as much as I think his dress was not among the best at all, I don’t think it’s fair, because as usual they are sending the message to all the viewers that avant-garde is about crazy designs, BUT IT’S NOT. Avant-garde is all about thinking outside the box, but it can be in inspiration or in the concept behind a certain dress, not necessarily about what you can see. Fäde, after struggling for the whole challenge, had a strong concept, a futuristic one, a concept which brought about reflections about how people and the world in general is more and more linked in an ever-flowing stream of communication. So my question is: why could I see this - and it was pretty obvious I think - while people being directly involved in fashion couldn’t? This makes me mad at the judges, because they proved again that they are not open and deep-minded.

Again, everyone is criticising Sandhya and wondering how she could be in the top again. I don’t know if I would have put her in the top, but for sure she had a great idea. Yes, I would have eliminated the dangling pieces from the front of the dress, and maybe the pinwheels were really too childish. But I thought the coloured stripes of the jumpsuit underneath with the peeping holes of the coat made a fantastic pattern. And I can’t help appreciating how she’s confident with her point of view, but not in a negative, arrogant way, I see enthusiasm in her behaviour, and you could totally say she’s passionate about what she wants. Every time someone criticises her work she explains that once finished it’s going to be good. Yes, maybe she has to learn how to take critiques without always questioning them, but she stands for what she thinks, and I appreciate this. She’s not my favourite at all, but it’s undeniable that she has all this quality.

More than being shocked by the fact Sandhya is on the top, people should really wonder why Alexander is still in the competition. This time he didn’t have a bad outfit, but I can’t help thinking about all the times he had a TERRIBLE dress and wasn’t sent home. As I say for every season of Project Runway, for every season there’s that one designer with no talent at all who, no one knows how, manages to get to at least the semifinal. I guess this season the chosen one is Alexander.

xxx

London Fashion Week - Day 3

Preen by Thornton Bregazzi (photo 1) opened the day with an explosion of colours. They mixed a lot of prints, which is one of the most difficult things to do for a designer, because it can easily go wrong, but they did it beautifully turning their models into members of a modern urban tribe. Fringes were then paired with a sporty feel made of dynamic stripes and maxi zippers.

Richard Nicoll was inspired by Tinkerbell and I admit this was one of those times in which inspiration makes everything even worse. The overall impression was that of a collection not young enough to live up to the expectations of such an inspiration, with shiny fabrics and chiffon giving everything a cheap look over already boring shapes. One thing I liked: the knitted nets over some of the looks. Marios Schwab missed the mark as well, trying to go really minimal and ending up only being sad and uninspiring.

Matthew Williamson (photo 2) turned to 70s, and you could totally see Barbarella walking in those looks of him. Definitely not the most creative and new collection, but he offered a wide choice of different pieces - which is always a good thing - in a very wearable version without being boring.

Temperley London used formal suits as the centrepiece for every look - sometimes it was a tailored waistcoat, or a pair of suit trousers - matching them with less formal attire, such as shorts. In general, though, it looked like the models had too many pieces over their body, and this makes it difficult to appreciate the outfit in itself. The best pieces were the kimono-coats with open sleeves.

Toga delivered a collection whose main adjective can only be STRANGE. There was a certain degree of research on fabric, mixing hard and soft - in the shape of sheer textiles and denim, for example. I didn’t quite like those looks where models had chiffon ruffles on their armpits, it really made them look hairy. I especially appreciated the last, patchwork style looks.

Ashley Williams (photo 3) went really creative with her inspiration - and quite complex as well - trying to depict the style of Vietnamese prostitutes in the 60s, with their own - read wrong - interpretation of American style. So cool. So damn cool. Everything was cliché about America, but at the same time in the collection is perfectly mixed with the Asian culture. It’s even slightly vulgar - just look at the print ‘Kick Ass’ on one of the skirts - but this just makes it all the more exciting and strong.

We’re used to seeing Vivienne Westwood among the best collections, so it’s not a surprise I’m talking about her Red Label collection (photo 4) for this season as well. Military, pirates - a recurrent theme in Westwood’s work - and brooches calling for ‘Yes!’ over the Scottish referendum next week: all of this seems even connected. If you then look at how Mrs Westwood exaggerated the shoulders to her army of models, well, the message is pretty clear: a new strong Scotland which walks independent toward its greatness.

Mary Katrantzou (photo 5) has become in a few years one of the most awaited moments in London Fashion Week schedule. This time she thought about the origin of the world, so this definitely explains the antropomorphic figures coming out of her little dresses this time, half humans/half lizards, sometimes even resurrecting from primordial flowers. And primordial is the adjective I think about even when I see the algae-like decorations I see completely covering some other outfits - look at the photo I chose - or even the straight, simple and primitive lines characterising some of the first exits on the runway.

David Koma went all futuristic with diagonal lines, mesh, colour blocking, bouclée leather, in general good but already seen. Jonathan Saunders (photo 6) instead was inspired by a Japanese fabric which looks like paper and started exploring the concept of lightness. I actually don’t see lightness at all in his very structured pieces decorated by heavy and huge bows or in his stiff jackets with huge pockets. But this doesn’t mean I didn’t like it. I thought he managed to mould the fabric in incredibly elegant and feminine ways. I simply loved it, no matter what the inspiration was.

Peter Jensen (photo 7) chose ‘Peanuts’ and a junior approach to his designs which gave everything a slight ‘bad kid’ atmosphere to the whole collection. The sun yellow pieces gave that euphoria I haven’t seen so often during ss15 shows. Last, the struggle for future is obvious in the collection by Threeasfour (photo 8) bringing to London basic pieces both for men and women, who continuously interchanged roles even on the runway. White, greyish green were the only colours used, with sudden pops of yellow, which really seems the hot colour for next spring.

xxx

London Fashion Week - Day 1 & 2

After leaving New York the fashion elite moved straight to Europe where most of the fashion month takes place, and now, ladies and gents, we’re in LONDON!!! After I didn’t have time to post a review for the first day yesterday because I was really, really busy - the truth is I was all day at the beach with my friends :D - I decided that after all I could make just one big post about the first two days of fashion, also because the first day is usually just a warm-up, but the real show starts on Saturday. So here I go with my favourite collections!

The first day opened with J. JS Lee showing a collection in which the reflection about sewing and tailoring seemed to be the focus. The designer made good use of pattern-making constructing dresses by putting the panels in strange, uncommon positions, having in this way the chance to play with patterns as well, for example stripes, and resulting in amazing optical impressions.

Faustine Steinmetz (photo 1) was one of the new designers to put an eye on according to Vogue.co.uk, and hell if they were right! She’s from Paris and she brought to the table what really London Fashion Week is about: creating something new. Her collection was all about manipulating fabric, especially denim, by ripping and tearing apart but also hysterically pleating, suggesting to find beauty in what is usually considered old and useless. A kind of statement AGAINST fashion in its most common meaning- and if it’s coming from a new designer who is taking her first steps in fashion, this is all the more meaningful - which seems to bring questions about the art of fashion itself. Not a casa that this was not a runway show but a presentation.

Bora Aksu (photo 2) continues with his interest in tradition and this time the designer chose to tell a fairy-tale. You could actually see some Cinderella dresses on the runway - and I’m not talking about the Cinderella princess only, but I’m referring to Cinderella the maid as well! The knitwear and the lace are a print in themselves and look like they want to tell a story, full of birds, and flowers, and sometimes it even looks like there’s a face in it. Pastel colours and white chiffon were the ultimate elements adding a sort of fairy-tale atmosphere to the whole line.

Daks decided to stay away from its usual check prints for this season and opted for feathers and grey tones - what a change! - and Fyodor Golan presented a nice collection, maybe too crafty sometimes, but I appreciated the vibrant colourful stripes.

As I said before, the real show starts with the second day, and Barbara Casasola (photo 3) represented an understated but effortless beginning for this fashion week. She looked at her native Brazil, but not with the usual clichés about it in mind - Samba dancers, Carnival, colours, music. She turned to the architecture of the biggest cities in Brazil, more and more modern. The result was essential lines and toned-down colours; you could possibly see the sun of Brazil in the golden pleated skirts flowing beautifully on the runway. But in general, one thing was once again valid: less is more.

Jasper Conran was visibly inspired by art, especially action painting and 60s-like motifs and patterns. Emilia Wickstead (photo 4) delivered one of the best collections from yesterday, and I found it interesting to read, on style.com, that she explained her collection by saying: ‘I had this vision of a young girl getting dressed up for a night out, dancing in front of the mirror to someone like David Bowie or Bryan Ferry, and very excited at perhaps seeing her crush at the club that night’. I’m sorry, but I can’t see all this. I mean, her inspiration should be a girl from the 80s, right? Well, I imagine that girl to be messy and going a little bit crazy, and Wickstead’s collection was definitely NOT messy. And I loved it. What’s the amazing fabric she used for the dress in the photo I chose? It looks like nothing, like air, it’s incredibly light. In this collection there was no decoration, no ornament, every look uses only one type of fabric for the entire dress, sometimes two for separates. Effortlessness at its extreme.  

While Wickstead’s collection didn’t have any kind of ornament to it, Julien Macdonald (photo 5) was all about decorations. Simple dresses were made rich and opulent by ruffles, knitted panels or beautiful textiles kind of referencing the designs of antique Chinese vases.

Markus Lupfer (photo 6) managed to go extremely fresh with this contemporary collection in which variety and youth were visible in every look. The elements to achieve all this were mainly iridescent fabrics, belts in unusual parts of the body, and a great cohesion, noticeable for example in one simple thing like the length of the dresses, all the same distance above the knee. 

Sibling (photo 7) screamed 80s for this season. Madonna - the Madonna of the beginning - was depicted on a t-shirt, Keith Haring style patterns covered many of the pieces, an attitude towards exaggerated shoulders and proportions was obvious in every look and, not least, black leather. Maybe the inspiration was a little bit too obvious, but sometimes it’s good to have it literally thrown into your face.

Danielle Romeril was inspired by camping and life in the wood. I don’t like camouflage but this time the designers made great use of it, putting it creatively in a collection full of earth-toned looks. Hunter Original had probably the best inspiration I’ve seen so far, Dazzle print - a technique used by British navy during the war to cover their warships with optical patterns which made it hard for the enemy to identify them. All this was sealed up by uniform-like looks, which referenced the inspiration and at the same time balanced the psychedelic prints.

Holly Fulton (photo 8) went folk for ss15 with very tiny symbols completely covering the dresses, which kind of made the print look like a monogram pattern. I would have actually liked more variety of silhouettes, but in general the collection was a strong one.

J. W. Anderson (photo 9) confirmed to be one of the most interesting designers around, this time looking for new ways of using a garment. His reinvention happened through the use of oversize buttons, for example, or reshaped necklines, obi belts used as tops and sweaters becoming little dresses, all of this without forgetting wearability. Great achievement.

The brand Joseph presented a collection in which not all the looks worked in my opinion, but I really liked the simple knitted jersey dresses as well as the slender flowy chiffon frocks. House of Holland (photo 10) proved that one of the signature adjective of the brand is colourful, with a flamboyant collage of flowers and paisley elements over girly silhouettes.

Marchesa (photo 11) celebrated its tenth anniversary with a stunning, amazing, breath-taking collection. Gypsy style was at the core of the designs this time, and you don’t really expect this from a brand which is all about elegance and impeccable gowns; yet, Chapman and Craig managed to translate it into the Marchesa DNA resulting in an amazing atmosphere of majestic and powerful dresses.

KTZ (photo 12) obsessively repeated Ancient Greece-style cameos over their looks, and even when the cameos were not involved, like in the crocodile looks, the ‘carving’ inspiration was obvious. There were some sporty looks as well as more sophisticated pieces, but the fil rouge was actually how beautifully they were literally sculpted over the body. The colour palette was essentially black and white; colours would have been really too much.

Finally, a designer I really liked is Duro Olowu, which for this season as well proved to be the master of the prints, but also showed he can go really elegant and classic chic, with beautiful long gowns.

xxx

New York Fashion Week TOP 5

Before getting to the beginning of London Fashion Week - my review for the first day is coming late today, I’m telling you - here you have my TOP 5 of the best collections of this just passed New York Fashion Week! Enjoy!

1. Ostwald Helgason: couldn’t help loving this collection inspired by the fall of the Berlin wall and packed with emotions

2. Alexander Wang: he proves to be one of the most innovative designers aroung with this show completely inspired by sport

3. Marc Jacobs: his collection wasn’t only pretty, it was intellectual for the comparison it seemed to state between uniforms and the role of fashion

4. Delpozo: architecture is completely breathable in the structures created by Josep Font. And I just love it.

5. Honor: not one of the most famous brands but managed to convey romantic chic looks using colours and especially IRONY, something missing from the fashion today always more often.

Do you agree with my TOP 5?

xxx

New York Fashion Week - DAY 8: LAST DAY!
On the last day of runway shows, that day in which you can already feel the transition from a city to another, very few designers show their collection - after all, you can’t have a very busy schedule when everyone is leaving the city to go to the next hot place.
Dorin Negrau  (photo 1) put on an interesting show playing with the role of woman and traditional Romanian dress. Black lace and white spiderweb-like woven shawls, mysteriously covering the body were suddenly lighted up by the colourful flower embroideries coming from the traditional Eastern attire and, I would say, kind of referenced the colours of Orthodox Byzantine icons. Skin, though, was widely shown through the use of strategically placed sheer panels.
Francisco Costa changed a little bit the rules of the game for Calvin Klein Collection. Navy for spring? Glitters? Laser-cut leather? All of this together seems pretty different from what we are used to see in the brand. Costa went a little bit dark and kind of followed the tendency at keeping the distance from extreme simplicity which we’ve so much seen during this season’s runways.
Chloë Sevigny unveiled her much anticipated collection for Opening Ceremony (photo 2) and the final verdict is generally positive. It’s obvious to see Parisian chic in her designs - one of the models was even wearing a béret - which makes me think she - smartly - played with the French sounding of her name - though she’s American and her family originally from Canada. But apart from this, she also proved to be able of more interesting choices, like that of using pinstripes for her girly designs. 
Marc Jacobs (photo 3) beautifully closed this average New York Fashion Week with a collection of uniforms. His challenge this time seems to have been how to make a uniform look pretty. And he definitely managed to do it. Not only did he create an amazing collection where shirt-trouser separates were accompanied by cute - but rigorous, after all they were uniforms - cocktail dresses, all of them draped or decorated with stones and pearls to enhance their inner femininity, but his choice of taking into consideration uniforms starts an interesting reflection on fashion itself. So, the question seems to be whether fashion wants to force people to uniform and follow a certain style dictated by the designers or fashion as more of an inspiration, something that you can follow or not, or something that you can customise and adjust to your own personality. And Marc Jacobs did this: he took uniforms and adjusted them to the personality of his brand.
Don’t forget to stay tuned with my blog to see THE BEST OF New York Fashion Week and, from tomorrow, follow me into London Fashion Week! And later today - or tomorrow - there will be my weekly Project Runway review :D
xxx
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New York Fashion Week - DAY 8: LAST DAY!

On the last day of runway shows, that day in which you can already feel the transition from a city to another, very few designers show their collection - after all, you can’t have a very busy schedule when everyone is leaving the city to go to the next hot place.

Dorin Negrau  (photo 1) put on an interesting show playing with the role of woman and traditional Romanian dress. Black lace and white spiderweb-like woven shawls, mysteriously covering the body were suddenly lighted up by the colourful flower embroideries coming from the traditional Eastern attire and, I would say, kind of referenced the colours of Orthodox Byzantine icons. Skin, though, was widely shown through the use of strategically placed sheer panels.

Francisco Costa changed a little bit the rules of the game for Calvin Klein Collection. Navy for spring? Glitters? Laser-cut leather? All of this together seems pretty different from what we are used to see in the brand. Costa went a little bit dark and kind of followed the tendency at keeping the distance from extreme simplicity which we’ve so much seen during this season’s runways.

Chloë Sevigny unveiled her much anticipated collection for Opening Ceremony (photo 2) and the final verdict is generally positive. It’s obvious to see Parisian chic in her designs - one of the models was even wearing a béret - which makes me think she - smartly - played with the French sounding of her name - though she’s American and her family originally from Canada. But apart from this, she also proved to be able of more interesting choices, like that of using pinstripes for her girly designs. 

Marc Jacobs (photo 3) beautifully closed this average New York Fashion Week with a collection of uniforms. His challenge this time seems to have been how to make a uniform look pretty. And he definitely managed to do it. Not only did he create an amazing collection where shirt-trouser separates were accompanied by cute - but rigorous, after all they were uniforms - cocktail dresses, all of them draped or decorated with stones and pearls to enhance their inner femininity, but his choice of taking into consideration uniforms starts an interesting reflection on fashion itself. So, the question seems to be whether fashion wants to force people to uniform and follow a certain style dictated by the designers or fashion as more of an inspiration, something that you can follow or not, or something that you can customise and adjust to your own personality. And Marc Jacobs did this: he took uniforms and adjusted them to the personality of his brand.

Don’t forget to stay tuned with my blog to see THE BEST OF New York Fashion Week and, from tomorrow, follow me into London Fashion Week! And later today - or tomorrow - there will be my weekly Project Runway review :D

xxx

New York Fashion Week: DAY 7

While in this moment the last runway shows of New York Fashion Week are taking place in the American fashion capital, my fashion diary continues with the collections from yesterday.

Falguni and Shane Peacock (photo1) was the great surprise from yesterday. The strength of this collection lay in the rebel atmosphere attached to dresses with feminine and romantic shapes: little cocktail dresses with graphic prints, studded jackets and full skirts.

Jason Wu for Boss delivered a collection in which measure, cleanness and square-cut were the key-words for every piece. Betsey Johnson (photo 2) finally came back with a pleasant runway collection, much better than her collections during the past seasons. This time it was all about wedding: yards of chiffon, ruffles, white everywhere, silk but also some kinky-like outfits - it wouldn’t be Betsey without that. I kinda realised Betsey Johnson would be Miley Cyrus’s choice for a wedding.

Anna Sui looked up to the late 60s and, I would say, 70s as well: you could totally see Mick Jagger and the sexual liberation in her genderless outfits in kaleidoscopic prints. 

Michael Kors (photo 3) was very bon ton instead, as usual I would say. A little garden in an elegant, classic residential area, this is the first thing his collection made me think of. And Michael really showed that, after all, it’s extremely easy to make flowers appear interesting again: just make them in colours which are in strong contrast with the background and, voilà! You have something which appeals to every age.

Steven Alan (photo 4) took shirts as his starting point for the concept of this collection, and he created total looks centred on this classic piece of wardrobe: chemisier dresses, caftans with buttons, prints mimicking the patterns of classic shirts.

Delpozo (photo 5) was the real showstopper though. Josep Font showed how to make extremely complex things look extremely simple. Origami skirts and shirts were, for example, delivered in full colours. There are no ‘half-shades’ in Delpozo world, all the colours are just that: there’s no emerald green, lemon yellow and coral red, but just green, yellow, red. There’s no compromise: it’s colour or not. And if it’s not, then just go for chiffon which looks like nothing, it’s impalpable, ethereal, out-of-this-world.

Jeremy Scott’s collection looked like Betsey Johnson designing for Desigual. He tried to be innovative and maybe even ironic, but it was just a boring freak show. With Miley Cyrus in it.

Elizabeth & James was the first brand I’ve seen during this fashion week showing a simplicity which was missing during this season’s runway shows, that kind of minimalism that Victoria Beckham mastered but from which she slightly turned away for Spring 2015. Later yesterday I’ve seen the same attitude in the line by Assembly, making me think that maybe not every hope is lost.

Proenza Schouler (photo 6) showed a really subtle collection which grew on me the more I looked at it. It was one of those collections where you can’t immediately see the mastery and the design behind it, but then you start taking into consideration laser cut leather, and fringes under a cut-out sweater, a total new take on classic American sportswear. And you just end up loving it.

I would like to finish my review by talking about how the designer duo behind the brand Trademark took an inspiration and started their design process not by immediately applying that inspiration in design, but first of all by working on the inspiration itself. India was the start, but how to make it new and unexpected? Just look at it from a menswear point of view. Instead of looking up to traditional South Asian womenswear, such as sari for example, they started by taking into consideration the underestimated field of traditional menswear, resulting in a beautiful effortless colourful collection of caftans, pajama suits and coats naturally translated into womenswear. You can’t even see the starting point if you don’t look at it carefully. And this is wonderful.

xxx

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